Change your Wi-Fi network name and password: a step-by-step guide

We’ve all been there: you get internet service set up, and the default Wi-Fi name is something generic and forgettable, while the password is the opposite, being so unique that no one could ever remember it. If you don’t want to be known on your block by your Internet Provider or don’t want to type in 10 to 20 random alphanumeric characters every time you sign on a new device, it’s time to learn how to change your user name and password.

Default name and password

This name and password assigned to you when you got your modem or gateway (a modem/router combo) is important, and is almost always somewhere you won’t lose it: printed on the bottom or side of the device. You will need this to connect the first time, and to log onto your online Wi-Fi manager to change your settings. If you have changed the name/password and forgotten what they are, you need to reset the gateway to the factory default settings by pressing the “reset” button on the back for at least 10 seconds.

Find your IP address

Your IP is a string of numbers separated by periods. For all three gateways provided by Easy Internet Now (Pace 5268ac, Motorola NVG589, and Arris BGW210) the IP is:

192.168.1.254

If you have a different modem or gateway, finding your IP is easy. If it isn’t printed on your device along with your default name and password, or inside the manual that comes with the device, you can find it quickly on your computer.

For Windows:

  1. Type “Command Prompt” in the search bar of your Start Menu, and then click to open.
  2. Type “ipconfig” and press Enter.
  3. Your IP address will be located under “Wireless LAN,” beside “Default Gateway.”

For Mac:

  1. Go to the Apple menu, and select System Preferences.
  2. Select Network.
  3. Select Advanced.
  4. Select the TCP/IP tab.
  5. Your IP address will be beside Router.

(Thanks to How-to Geek for the Mac info!)

Some terms to know:

  • Your Wi-Fi name will likely be called your “Network ID,” “SSID,” or some combination of the two.
  • Your password will probably be called your “Network Key,” “Passkey,” “Security Key,” “WPA-PSK key,” or some combination.

Go to your online Wi-Fi manager:

You need to access your settings online and can do so using your IP address.

IP address in the address bar

  1. Paste or type your IP address in the search bar of an internet browser and press enter.
  2. Enter your default user name and password (printed on your modem/gateway) if prompted.

From here, exact instructions will depend upon the modem or gateway you have. However, your security settings must be set to WPA-PSK to change your network name. Security settings are usually located within the same tab or link to change your password and network name.

Pace 5268ac gateway:

Manual (page 17, 18):

  1. Select the Settings tab.
  2. Select the LAN tab.
  3. Select Wireless.
  4. Enter your new network name in the field titled Network Name (SSID).
  5. Select Use Custom Wireless Network Key.
  6. Enter your new password.
  7. Make setting selections for both your User SSID and your Guest SSID. (The Guest network allows you to provide your guest’s Wi-Fi without having to provide access to your personal connection or password. There are multiple radio bands within each network, and each radio band—2.4 GHz or 5 GHz—should be named the same as the others within that network—User or Guest).
  8. Select Save.

    https://setuprouter.com/router/motorola/nvg589/manual-1741.pdf

NVG589 gateway:

Manual (page 46-48)

  1. Your default user name will be “Admin,” and your default password will be a unique phrase or string of letters and numbers printed on the gateway.
  2. Select Modify your Wireless security or settings from the list of Common Tasks on the right side of the page.
  3. Enter your new network name in the field titled Network Name (SSID).
  4. Ensure your Security setting is WPA-PSK in the drop-down box (this should be the default).
  5. Enter your new password in the field titled Key.
  6. Select Save.

BGW 210 gateway:

This router doesn’t have a user manual, but the AT&T support page provides information on how to access your settings.

  1. Enter your IP address in the search bar and press enter.
  2. Select Home Network.
  3. Select Wi-Fi.
  4. Enter your Device Access Code in the Access Code field as it is printed on your device.
  5. Select Continue.
  6. Select 2.4 or 5 GHz radio from the Radio Selection box. (Your gateway has multiple radio bands and will choose the one with the best signal on a case-by-case basis. You can assign names to each of them, but for the best functionality, they should have the same name).
  7. Make setting selections for both your User SSID and your Guest SSID. (The Guest network allows you to provide your guest’s Wi-Fi without having to provide access to your personal connection or password. There are multiple radio bands within each network, and each radio band—2.4 GHz or 5 GHz—should be named the same as the others within that same network—Home or Guest).
  8. Turn on User SSID Enable.
  9. Enter your new network name in the Network Name (SSID) box.
  10. Ensure security is set to WPA-PSK.
  11. Enter your new password in the Password box.
  12. Select Save.

Changing your network name and password is pretty easy, once you know where to look for the options. But what should I change it to? I can’t really tell you that. Your password should be easy to remember but hard to guess and contain numbers and special characters. Buzzfeed has some funny, nerdy ideas for names if you don’t want to use your own (like “This one, Nana,” or “Pretty Fly For a WiFi”).

funny Wi-Fi names

Buzzfeed: https://www.buzzfeed.com/jessicaprobus/no-more-free-wifi?utm_term=.rq5BW0Gpb#.sp64A0RWD

 

Have a great idea for a funny network name? Tweet at me!

@easyinternetnow

@willreadforfood

 

2017-07-26T11:24:38+00:00July 26th, 2017|Support, Tips & Tricks|

About the Author:

Abigail Eskew is a senior at Missouri State University, studying Professional Writing, with a side of Creative Writing. She enjoys reading and writing, puns, teaching knock-knock jokes to kids, and pretending she has a cooking show in her kitchen. She does not enjoy getting up early or writing biographical information.